Posts Tagged ‘Mandu’

Anand Nagri Mandu is a perfect holiday destination for nature lovers, history/architecture fans and honeymoon couples alike!

If you plan to head to the hills, with a feel of romance and happiness, Mandu is the place to be. It is a celebration in stone, of life and joy, after all one of its most famous legends is the love story of Baz Bahadur and Rani Roopmati. The locals, even today, sing of the romance of these royal lovers and high up on the peak of a hill, Roopmati’s Pavilion still gazes down at Baz Bahadur’s Palace, a magnificent expression of Afghan architecture.

LOCATION AND HISTORY

Also called Mandavgad, Mandu is a city of ruins, situated at a distance of about 90 km from Indore, a city in Madhya Pradesh. Balanced along the Vindhya ranges at an altitude of 2000 feet, Mandu was originally the fort capital of the Parmar rulers of Malwa. Towards the end of the 13th century, it came under the control of the Sultans of Malwa, the first of whom named it Shadiabad – ‘city of joy’.
The famous fort of Mandu is separated from the surrounding plateau by a deep ravine called Kakra Khoh, which encircles it on the east, west and north. The ruins are spread over an area of 21 sq km and are surrounded by lush undergrowth and crystal clear lakes and ponds.
With its natural defenses, no wonder Mandu is named a city of joy!

FUSION OF HINDUS AND AFGHAN ARCHITECTURE 

Mandu has a rich and varied heritage and history. It is known for its marvelous fort, 82 km in perimeter. The fort is considered the biggest in India. As a witness to Mandu’s military past, stands the battlemented wall, which is nearly 37 km and is punctuated by 12 gateways. Mandu has over 40 monuments, which are divided into 3 broad categories: the Central Village Group, the Royal Enclave Group and the Rewa Kund Group.

NOT-TO-MISS PLACES


The Darwazas

Most notable of the gateways of Mandu is Delhi Darwaza, the main entrance to the fortress city. The approach is made through a series of gateways with walled enclosures and strengthened by bastions such as the Alamgir and Bhangi Darwaza, through which the present road passes. Rampol Darwaza, Jehangir Gate and Tarapur Gate are some of the other main gateways.

The Royal Jahaz Mahal

Also called Ship Palace, this two-storied architectural marvel is so named as it appears like a ship floating in water. It is built between the two artificial lakes, Munj Talao and Kapur Talao. With its open pavilions, Jahaz Mahal is an imaginative recreation in stone of a royal pleasure craft. The domes of the building present an unforgettable spectacle, as a silhouette, on a moonlit night, when viewed from the adjoining Taveli Mahal.

Hindola Mahal

Hindola Mahal, meaning Swing palace is so named due to its sloping sidewalls. Superb and innovative techniques are evident from the architecture of this palace. To the West of Hindola Mahal, there are several unidentified buildings which still bear traces of their past grandeur. Amidst these is an elaborately constructed well, named Champa Baoli. Other places of interest in this enclave are Dilawar Khan’s Mosque, the Nahar Jharokha (tiger balcony), Taveli Mahal, the two large wells called the Ujali (bright) and Andheri (dark) Baolis and Gada Shah’s Shop and House, all worth a visit.

Hoshang Shah’s Tomb

India’s first marble structure, it is one of the most refined examples of Afghan architecture. It served as a template for the construction of the beauty, Taj Mahal.
Apart from these, Jami Masjid, the gorgeous palace of Baz BahadurRewa KundRoopmati’s Pavilion and others are some of the fascinating monuments of Mandu. There is also the Echo Point, the ‘Delphic Oracle’ of Mandu. A shout from here reverberates far below and is heard clearly back. The Lohani Caves and Temple Ruins, not far from the royal enclave area also deserve a visit due to their association with Mandu’s history. Sunset Point, in front of the caves affords a panoramic view of the surrounding countryside.

THE STRONGEST CALL

The call of Mandu is strongest when it turns lush green, with the dark monsoon clouds hovering and showering over. The mystical beauty of the monuments, amidst this green landscape and purple sunset sky, paints the live picture of the bygone era. The effect is completed by the rich surroundings of mango, tamarind and banyan trees. Mandu is also famous for the mouth-watering ‘Khusrani Imli’, tamarind trees that bear fruits only in the rainy season and for the juicy custard apples. Apart from these, Mandu is known for the attractive Chanderi and Rewa (Maheshwari) saris as well as medicinal herbs and local handicrafts.
The glory of the architectural gem Mandu lives on, in legends and songs, recorded for the generations to come.

Read original article at: http://epaper.namoleague.com/EpaperArticle.aspx?title=The%20City%20Of%20Joy:%20Mandu_738

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